Katie Paterson 'Vatnajokull (the sound of) 2007/8 - Altermodern Tate Triennial

Katie Paterson 'Vatnajokull (the sound of) 2007/8 - Altermodern Tate Triennial

 

Library research on Katie Paterson

I thought that Katie Patersons work is really beautiful as she looks as far back as the big bang and how particles from back then form the basis of what is now. She looks at energy as a limited resource as Altermodern states an email from Alex Gibbs an astronomer to Paterson 'if the universe keeps expanding then the entropy will just increase and everything will slowly die and there will be no free energy left' I love how conceptual and philosophical her work is based on spaces and her photographs are really inspiring and convey her subject of energy and the natural components of the world around us.

What is interesting about 'The sound of' is that it is not only a visual piece t is also interactive an audible as stated on her website when the piece was exhibited a number was to be rung by audience members and they would hear the sounds omitted from a microphone under the glaciers in the images.

'An underwater microphone lead into Jökulsárlón lagoon - an outlet glacial lagoon of Vatnajökull, filled with icebergs - connected to an amplifier, and a mobile-phone, which created a live phone line to the glacier. The number +44(0)7757001122 could be called from any telephone in the world, the listener put through to Vatnajökull. A white neon sign of the phone number hung in the gallery space.'   http://www.katiepaterson.org/vatnajokull/ 

 

Kader Attia: Continuum of Repair: The Light of Jacob's Ladder

Kader Attia: Continuum of Repair: The Light of Jacob's Ladder

Mike Nelson selects from the V-A-C collection: Again, more things (a table ruin)

Mike Nelson selects from the V-A-C collection: Again, more things (a table ruin)

Battle of Queen Boudicca and Roman invaders

I started my research on kings cross as far back in history as i could which is the Roman era where Kings cross is said to be the setting of the battle between Queen Boudicca and Roman invaders. It is also said that Boudicca was buried underneath what is now Platform 9 at Kings cross station. 

Warrior Queen Boudicca

Kings Cross - Gasholder 8

 

When researching Kings cross and its history i came across reports of industrialisation and polluting company's such as gas and coal works; I then looked at the recently renovated Gas holder 8 which will soon be made into a park in a new location from its old spot. Here is some research I gathered from the official kings cross website:

 

Gasholder No.8 was built for the storage of town gas for Pancras Gasworks. Gas was manufactured here using coal from the Imperial Gas, Light and Coke Company. The gasholder formed part of the largest gas works in London and remained in use until the late 20th Century. It was decommissioned in 2000.

The gasholder was originally constructed in the 1850s and expanded in 1883. The guideframe consists of 16 hollow cylindrical cast iron columns in two tiers and two levels of wrought iron riveted lattice girders. The distinctive 25 metre high circular guide frame has an internal diameter of over 35 metres.

http://www.kingscross.co.uk/gasholder-8

 

The St. Pancras gas works and its famous holders the prominent, and listed, gasholders which everyone could see as their train pulls out of Kings Cross and/or St.Pancras Stations have gone. "A fine example of gas making practice.' Until 1869 this was the largest works in London with every facility available to the modern gasworks of the Victorian period.

http://marysgasbook.blogspot.co.uk/2009/08/stpancras-works-and-its-famous-holders.html 

 

Gasholder 8 plans for the future

Gas holder materials

Cast iron and wrought iron were both used to construct the gas holder frames at the Pancras gas works. Cast iron can be melted down and poured into a mould to shape and solidify. Wrought iron is made by reprocessing cast iron, and is said to be stronger than cast iron due to the way it is made; the strength of wrought iron is more certain than cast iron. Wrought iron is often used present day to construct gates and fences.

St Pancras clock tower

The St Pancras clock tower

The building was originally constructed between 1868 and 1873 as the flagship hotel for the Midland Railway Company. Designed by the architect George Gilbert Scott as the accompaniment to the railway station shed by Henry Barlow, the hotel operated only until 1935 before being turned into railway offices and allowed to enter a general state of degradation. 

http://www.stpancrasclocktower.co.uk/history.html 

Lighting up kings cross

Lighting up kings cross

Lighting up kings cross

Lighting up Kings Cross

In my research of the history of the Kings Cross area I notice one distinct difference which is light; in the old photographs and old explanations of the area there is at first the picture of a buzzing industrial centre which quickly fades into the 90' perception of Kings cross which is a dingy run-down area used only for train inter-links. However now the buzz of the 19th century industrial era seems to be back and a lot brighter; it seems that wherever i look when leaving Uni in the dark of an evening, i see a source of light, in the CSM fountains, streetlampps, the cage swing and the brightly lit new corridor entrance to Kings Cross St. Pancras station. Looking at old pictures compared to new pictures i can see a burst of life and light due to the modernisation of the area, as new businesses move into the area it is becoming more noticeable and recognised. The idea of light pollution and modernisation replacing the old perceptions of kings cross is something i would like to focus on in this project.

Atsuko Tanaka, Electric Dress, 1957

Atsuko Tanaka, Electric Dress, 1957

Neon Ball Bubble, 2007-8 - Loris Greaud

Loris Greaud, 2013

Loris GreaudGunpowder Forest Bubble 2008 Synthetic resin sculptures covered with gunpowder, polystyrene, fibreglass, steel, paint 40 trees Each tree : 580 x 200 cm 228.3 x 78.7 in

Victory over the Sun - Malevich -(Performance Art, from futurism to the present, RoseLee Goldberg )

Victory over the Sun - Malevich -(Performance Art, from futurism to the present, RoseLee Goldberg )

I came across these designs in a book in the Library and i could relate the sharp geometrical and industrial looking shapes, they reminded me of my ideas to use the industrial shape of the gas holder as the inspiration for my costume.

Maleficent

Angelina Jolie on the Maleficent Horns -“We used my braids to nail [them] down,” she said. “It was a headpiece with the horns; it wasn’t like a headband. We kind of put my hair in [these] little balls and then you put the headpiece over it and pulled the braids through . . . Then we had different horns. First they were too heavy, then we got them softer, and then we found ones that snap off because I kept banging into things.” In the end, milliner Justin Smith, who crafted the fine leather—python skin and fish skin—that covered the horns, says that six different headpieces—representing different seasons—were made for the film.

http://www.vanityfair.com/vf-hollywood/angelina-jolie-maleficent-photos 

Granary square in darkness

Katie Paterson 'Light bulb to simulate moonlight' 2008

Barbican - The curve

Barbican - The curve

Martha Graham - Night Journey

I was thinking about movement in this project, so i have decoded to do some further research around the movement and energy of a costume through the practice of dance. In this piece by Martha Graham I noticed that headpieces are incorporated into the costume and also long - length dresses with flowing material at the length of the costumes. I like the way that the material flows and moves sharply with the movement of the dancers legs; it is really interesting creating a fan effect.

Reiner Ruthenbeck at the Serpentine Gallery

Reiner Ruthenbeck at the Serpentine Gallery

Katie Paterson 'Vatnajokull (the sound of) 2007/8 - Altermodern Tate Triennial

Katie Paterson 'Vatnajokull (the sound of) 2007/8 - Altermodern Tate Triennial

Katie Paterson, Inside this desert lies the tiniest grain of sand

http://www.katiepaterson.org/insidethisdesert/

I was researching Katie Paterson further on the internet and came across her website; i found a project that i have heard of before called inside this desert lies the tiniest grain of sand, where a grain of sand was taken from the Sahara desert and chipped away using micro/nano technology to become a  0.00005mm grain of sand. The tiny grain was buried back in the sahara. I love this project because to me it says that without each grain of sand, even the smallest, there would be no desert; even the smallest components in life make up a part of the world. 

Kader Attia: Continuum of Repair: The Light of Jacob's Ladder

Kader Attia: Continuum of Repair: The Light of Jacob's Ladder : The Whitechapel gallery

22/11/2014

Today I visited the Kader Attia exhibition at the Whitechapel gallery named continuum of repair: the light of Jacob's ladder. The exhibition is based around the biblical story of Jacob's Ladder, about Jacob the descendant of Isaac and Abraham, seeing a ladder to heaven in his dream where gods angels climbed and God stood at the top. 'Most scholars interpret Jacob's ladder as a connection between heaven and earth, with God taking the initiative to reach out to man.' http://christianity.about.com/od/biblestorysummaries/a/Jacobs-Ladder.htm . The exhibition was beautiful but left me slightly confused although the opening description was helpful i felt i had to further research the biblical story, i think this helped me to understand the exhibition more. At first i just saw a lot of books and artefacts based on science, religion, philosophy and history, towering around a small set of stairs leading to one long florescent light surrounded by mirrors and creating the illusion of Jacobs ladder. I now see that what i understand of the exhibit is that intelligence and learning about the world makes the connection between earth and a higher power more accessible; for example the pillars of wounded soldiers of WW1 featured at the exhibition could show how faith helps to heal and repair. 

Overall, Kader Attias messsage is as he states on the introduction note ' The biggest illusion of the human mind is probably the one on which man has built himself: the idea that he invents something, when all he does is repair' Attia is said to see repair as a 'process of renewal, re-appropriation and human development'.

Mike Nelson selects from the V-A-C collection: Again, more things (a table ruin)

Mike Nelson selects from the V-A-C collection: Again, more things (a table ruin)

Mike Nelson selects from the V-A-C collection: Again, more things (a table ruin) : The Whitechapel Gallery

22/11/2014

The Mike Nelson collection was an interesting exhibition which consisted of many different artworks and sculptures by many different artists, displayed on an old-looking wooden platform. The exhibit looked like a selection of sculptures that had been collected and put together, many working with metals and the human figure. All the works gather around the 4 white pieces in the middle by Pawel Althamer which stand out due to their distinct bright colour in comparison to the naturally industrial colours of the sculptures surrounding his works; My eye was instantly drawn to the over-powering white shade. 

Gasholder 8 Then

Oasis - Supersonic - Featuring the King's cross area and gasholder no.8

Oasis - Supersonic - Featuring the King's cross area and gasholder no.8

I came across this Oasis music video in my research which was filmed approximately 20 years ago, from this video depicting the King's Cross area I can see the changes in present day, where there is construction and scaffolding in the background is now modern buildings and new cranes and more construction.  'They filmed the video for Supersonic on the rooftop of what is now the self storage warehouse on Crestfield and Belgrove Streets off the Euston Road'  ( http://kingscrossenvironment.com/2014/01/24/oasis-in-kings-cross-supersonic-20-years-on/

 

St Pancras clock tower

Lighting up Kings Cross

Lighting up Kings cross

Atsuko Tanaka, Electric Dress, 1957

Atsuko Tanaka, Electric Dress, 1957

I really like the history in the industrialisation of Kings Cross and the way it was once transformed into a buzzing place before becoming less significant and now it becomes a valuable part of London again. The industrialisation of Kings cross made me think about light and how the gasworks once helped to bring energy to the area which is happening now again with the investment of new businesses in the area. This made me think of an artist we were shown in a presentation, Atsuko Tanaka, who created an electric dress, emitting light from all directions. I think the dress is really beautiful especially in black and white as we can see the spread of the light more clearly especially in images where movement is present. The dress is actually created using primary coloured light bulbs and addresses the human psychological system.

Neon Ball Bubble, 2007-8 - Loris Greaud and DGZ research - Altermodern

Loris Greaud, 2013

1918 Gas light and coke company workers

1918 Gas light and coke company workers

I searched for images of gas company workers in Kings cross during industrialisation, although this is the only image i could find, i thought it shows the attire that would have been worn at the time very well. I like that we see aprons and uniform which contextualises the photo in its place upon the gas holder. I also really like that many of the photos i have found are black and white although we see the modern structures of the gas works; I think i will keep the black and white scale theme in my costume in which i will add lights to show how the old has contributed to the new and modern King's cross we see today.

Winter Sun on the Viewing platform

Katie Paterson 'Light bulb to simulate moonlight' 2008

Katie Paterson 'Light bulb to simulate moonlight' 2008

As I continue my research into light and energy, I once again came across Katie Paterson and her piece 'Light bulb to simulate moonlight' 2008 which consists of a single bulb light source in a dark room, the bright light bulb hangs as though it is floating and existing as a living light source, lighting up every corner of the room. This piece made me think about how many lights i want to include in my costume whether it will be one single light or i will continue my idea of multiple lights.

Barbican - The curve

Barbican - The curve

Walead Beshty - The Curve - The Barbican

Walead Beshty - A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a future

This exhibition focuses on detail in a number of pieces, the quantity of work is the most amazing part of the exhibit, Beshty created more than 12,000 prints over a year using a UV sensitive cyanotype process. He printed objects from his own studio including water bottles and screws which were exposed to sunlight creating the blue and white effects throughout the exhibition. This exhibition inspired me to think about how i will stain the bottom of the cape i am making and what type of materials and textures Ishould use. This exhibition was really amazing just to walk around and take in the sheer amount of work; I really enjoyed looking at the smaller prints as they were so detailed compared to the larger prints such as ladders and plants. 

Martha Graham - Night Journey

Reiner Ruthenbeck at the Serpentine Gallery

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